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Engagement – A Key to a Successful Learning Program

The best learning program in the world isn’t worth the money spent if you’re unable to get your employees to engage in learning. Engagement is an on-going issue that employers face, especially during the learning period, but employers that are forward-thinking realize that the key is taking a step back and exploring new techniques and ideas. Here are some great tips to help engage employees in learning.

Make Employees Part of the Process

One of the biggest mistakes learning design teams make is creating a learning program for themselves rather than the learner and assuming it is perfect. Asking their learner for feedback about the learning process never occurs to them. The truth is that asking for feedback is one of the best ways to help current and future employees engage in learning.

   Employee feedback helps you:

  • Learn how different personality types respond to different aspects of the learning, enabling you to adapt your methods for each employee
  • Identify stagnant aspects of the learning process
  • Identify pieces of information that are missing from the learning program
  • Improve communication
  • Gather fresh ideas that you can choose to incorporate into your learning program

Encouraging employee engagement in learning is just one perk you’ll enjoy when you include collecting feedback into your learning process. Maybe it’s learner surveys, internal focus groups or better yet a series of one-on-ones with your learning base.

Create a Blend Experience to Engage

Are you taking an ILT or a vILT approach? You can speak at your employees until you lose your voice, but the odds are that most of them will zone out and miss most of what they’re learning. The best way to prevent this is to create pre-determined reinforcement breaks in the session. Launch a microlearning module that might last three mins to both reinforce what was stated and evaluate the knowledge that was understood. You’ll find that your employees pay more attention and do a better job retaining the information when they’re engaged in the learning process. When you combine your ILT or vILT with microlearning modules, you not only engage the employee, but you also make it possible for them to continually reinforce the knowledge by the ability to access the microlearning multiple times, if necessary. To take it even further, you can use learner insights and data to help the instructor fine-tune the presentation based upon problems area identified. You can also use microlearning and the data generated before the ILT or vILT session as pre-assessment to understand what the learning cohort does and doesn’t understand.

Check out this great client case study from Etech, regarding their use of microlearning and data: 

Get Other Employees Involved

There aren’t any rules stating that you’re the only person who can help employees learn. Who should you involve? Subject Matter Experts? Managers? It is important especially during onboarding for the learner to be introduced to many individuals across the organization, as there is no better way than learning from them. It’s okay to ask more experienced employees to help with the on-boarding of an employee or possibly lead an ILT or vILT session. You’ll find that this not only helps improve employee engagement, but also goes a long way towards getting your entire team to work together.

You’re going to find that engaging employees in learning require being open to new ideas and techniques. The more adaptable you are to different employee learning methods, the better your employees will respond.

Final Thoughts

As you continue to rethink how you engage your learners, it’s important to remain open to new ideas and techniques. Whether its involving learners in the creation process or integrating into reinforcement breaks, it’s all about finding something that works for your organization and company culture. Just remember, learning is not an “I” but a “WE”!

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